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Welcome to BCMS, Home of the Cubs!  Due to the school closure caused by Hurricane Michael last week, Burke Co. Public School Report Cards will be sent home on Thursday, October 18th, instead of their originally scheduled date, Oct. 17th.
Fultz, Shannon » Unit 4 Expressions

Unit 4 Expressions

Unit 4 Expressions
 
Apply and extend previous understandings of arithmetic to algebraic expressions.
 
MGSE6.EE.1 Write and evaluate expressions involving whole-number exponents.
 
MGSE6.EE.2 Write, read, and evaluate expressions in which letters stand for numbers.
 
MGSE6.EE.2a Write expressions that record operations with numbers and with letters standing for numbers. For example, express the calculation “Subtract y from 5” as 5-y.
 
MGSE6.EE.2b Identify parts of an expression using mathematical terms (sum, term, product, factor, quotient, coefficient); view one or more parts of an expression as a single entity. For example, describe the expression 2(8 + 7) as a product of two factors; view (8 + 7) as both a single entity and a sum of two terms.
 
MGSE6.EE.2c Evaluate expressions at specific values of their variables. Include expressions that arise from formulas used in real-world problems. Perform arithmetic operations, including those involving whole-number exponents, in the conventional order when there are no parentheses to specify a particular order (Order of Operations). For example, use the formulas 𝑉 = 𝑠3 and 𝐴 = 6𝑠2 to find the volume and surface area of a cube with sides of length 𝑠 = 1 2 .
 
MGSE6.EE.3 Apply the properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions. For example, apply the distributive property to the expression 3(2 + x) to produce the equivalent expression 6 + 3x; apply the distributive property to the expression 24x + 18y to produce the equivalent expression 6(4x + 3y); apply properties of operations to y + y + y to produce the equivalent expression 3y.
 
MGSE6.EE.4 Identify when two expressions are equivalent (i.e., when the two expressions name the same number regardless of which value is substituted into them.) For example, the expressions y + y + y and 3y are equivalent because they name the same number regardless of which number y stands for.
 
MGSE6.NS.4 Find the common multiples of two whole numbers less than or equal to 12 and the common factors of two whole numbers less than or equal to 100. a. Find the greatest common factor of 2 whole numbers and use the distributive property to express a sum of two whole numbers 1-100 with a common factor as a multiple of a sum of two whole numbers with no common factors. (GCF) Example: 36 + 8 = 4(9 + 2) b. Apply the least common multiple of two whole numbers less than or equal to 12 to solve real-world problem